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Algae

Photo collage: Algae on Lake Winnipeg as seen by LWF supporters (clockwise from top left): Victoria Beach, 2017: Jeope Wolfe; Spruce Sands Beach, 2021: Rosalie Lazar; Matlock, 2017: Wendy Buelow; Victoria Beach 2017: Corrine Flaws

As summer draws to a close, we are once again facing an all-too-familiar – and heartbreaking – sight: algal blooms on Lake Winnipeg.

These blooms are caused by excess phosphorus. We need your help to ensure our elected officials understand the impact of continued inaction on phosphorus reduction.

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Algae blooms at Connaught Beach and Lester Beach, July 2019; Photos (clockwise from top left): Murray McCaig, Jennifer Engbrecht, Carter Brooks, Laurie Bennett

Update: The city’s request for an extension for NEWPCC upgrades is now under review by the provincial regulator.

Manitoba Sustainable Development’s Environmental Approvals Branch must assess the city’s submission and decide whether or not to grant its request for a two-year extension. (The city has asked for a new deadline of Dec. 31, 2021, to come up with a plan that would include a revised date for a full plant upgrade and potential...

LWF’s work was recently featured in an article by DeSmog Canada as part of its “Ripple Effect” series, a collection of stories about efforts to protect Canada’s fresh water.

Along with Brokenhead Ojibway Nation and the Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources, LWF helped organize the gathering of First Nations mentioned in the article. We recognize that the unique and too often marginalized voices of Indigenous peoples are a vital part of any sustainable solutions for Lake Winnipeg, and we feel privileged to be able to help facilitate this process.

LWF communications director Marlo...

Harmful algal blooms have been increasing in size and frequency on Lake Winnipeg – contaminating beaches, reducing water quality, and damaging Manitoba’s important fishing and tourism industries.

Algal blooms are the result of eutrophication – a condition caused by an over-abundance of the nutrient phosphorus. All living things need phosphorus – in fact, it’s one of the ingredients in the fertilizers we give our house and garden plants and our agricultural crops to help them grow. However, too much of it is a problem because it contributes to the growth of blue...

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