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Planning now for the long-term health and sustainability of Manitoba's boreal forest ecosystem is one of the best ways to restore and protect the health of Lake Winnipeg, which is why Conserving the Boreal Forest is Action 2 of our Lake Winnipeg Health Plan.

Last month, the Province of Manitoba held a multi-stakeholder summit in The Pas/Opaskwayak Cree Nation to explore the development of a Manitoba Boreal Strategy. Greetings were offered by Conservation and Water Stewardship Minister Gord Mackintosh and Aboriginal and Northern Affairs Minister Eric Robinson, and a keynote address was given...


Joined by partners and supporters, LWF celebrated Canada Water Week 2015 by signing the Lake Friendly Accord and renewing its commitment to the Lake Winnipeg Health Plan. (Front row, l to r: Conservation and Water Stewardship Minister Gord Mackintosh, Mike Sampson, Laurel Harrison with Maeve Harrison, Janet Sampson with Isla Harrison, Ella Carmichael, LWF executive director Alexis Kanu; back row, l to r: Jeremy Harrison, Dunnottar Mayor and chair of the South Basin Mayors and Reeves Rick Gamble) Photo: Kirsten Earl McCorrister

Winnipeg – Today, on the final day of Canada Water Week 2015, LWF...

Past Alexander Bajkov Award winners (clockwise from top left): Val Weirer, Karen Scott, Rick Gamble, Lyle Lockhart

We know so many people who have devoted much of their personal and professional lives to help improve the health of Lake Winnipeg. That’s why, since 2008, the Lake Winnipeg Foundation has been publicly recognizing these passionate individuals with our Alexander Bajkov Award.

Named in honour of the pioneering researcher of Lake Winnipeg (you can read his bio here), this annual award is presented to a person who exemplifies Dr. Bajkov’s dedication to the understanding of Lake...

Photo: Gimli, 2014 (Paul Mutch)

LWF was founded in 2005, making this year our 10th anniversary!

We’re proud of our grassroots beginnings and the many passionate supporters whose dedication to our collective vision of a clean, healthy Lake Winnipeg and watershed, now and for future generations, has shaped LWF into what we are today.

We’re also proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish over the past decade: educating citizens, funding projects, and collaborating with governments, researchers and other stakeholders.

We’ve made progress – but our work is far from finished. Lake Winnipeg...

On Feb. 2, 1971, an intergovernmental treaty called the Ramsar Convention was adopted. Named for the Iranian city in which its adoption occurred, the convention came into force in 1975 to provide a framework for the conservation and wise use of wetlands and their resources. (You can learn more about the Ramsar Convention here.)

Today, almost 90 per cent of UN member states – including Canada – are considered “contracting parties.” Contracting parties implement the Ramsar Convention and collaborate on shared projects. More than 2,000 wetlands across the globe (37 in Canada) are currently...

Have a great idea for a project that can help save our lake? We can help make it happen!

LWF’s Stewardship, Research and Education Grants Program supports projects working to improve water quality in Lake Winnipeg and its watershed – particularly those which address one or more of the eight key actions to reduce nutrient loading identified in our Lake Winnipeg Health Plan.

Past projects have included educational resources, water-quality sampling and monitoring programs, video projects and various research projects.

The deadline for Spring 2015 grant applications is March 1, 2015. More...

The Pelly’s Lake Watershed Management Project is located just east of Holland, Man. A Spring 2013 grant from LWF went towards this project’s water-quality monitoring program. (Photo: Marlo Campbell)

LWF has awarded a total of $21,500 to three projects as part of our Stewardship, Research and Education Grants Program. Fall 2014 grants will support:

  • Caring for our Watersheds: a contest run by Oak Hammock Marsh Interpretive Centre in which high-school students will submit proposals on how they can help their watershed, with a goal of implementing as many projects as possible.
     
  • Determining extent...

Winnipeg – Members of Living Lakes Canada from Wildsight and the Lake Winnipeg Foundation (LWF) represented Canada at the 14th Living Lakes Conference in Nanchang, China last week. Kat Hartwig of Invermere, B.C. and Alex Salki of Winnipeg, Manitoba, were invited to present their work on sustainable management of lake communities, with a special focus on lake protection. The Canadian presentation focused on the significant water stewardship work being done by NGOs and water stewardship groups in the Columbia Basin and around Lake Winnipeg.  

The conference hosted 350 delegates from 33 countries...

A new publication is celebrating the multitude of benefits offered by Manitoba’s wetlands!

Nature’s Wealth is a joint release from LWF, Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) and the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD).

The four-page feature delves into the ecological and economic value of wetland areas – everything from water purification, flood protection, wildlife habitat, biofuels, recreational opportunities and even food!

It also highlights some of the conservation, policy and research initiatives currently underway across the province; readers get to meet research...

The Lake Winnipeg Foundation will bring local, science-based solutions to the 14th Living Lakes Conference in Nanchang, China, an event hosted by Global Nature Fund (GNF), a non-profit environmental foundation with headquarters in Germany.

From Nov. 18 to 24, representatives from some of the 104 members of GNF’s international network will be discussing lakes in densely populated areas and how best to balance people and nature. LWF is a founding member of Living Lakes Canada, one of six national Living Lakes networks working throughout the world to protect freshwater resources.

In 2013, GNF...

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