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October 2015

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Fresh water matters to us, and we know it matters to our members and supporters.

In the lead-up to Canada’s election, we wanted to learn more about how federal parties and candidates plan to address the challenges facing Lake Winnipeg.

We sent four questions – focused on solutions for Lake Winnipeg – to all Manitoba candidates representing the four federal parties running a full slate. We also contacted each party’s national headquarters.

Question 1

Canada currently has an $88 billion water infrastructure deficit (Our Living Waters Call to Action for the Next Government of Canada...

Dear LWF supporter,

Federal candidates respond to Lake Winnipeg questions

In the lead-up to Canada’s election on Oct. 19, we wanted to learn more about how federal parties and candidates plan to address the challenges facing Lake Winnipeg. We sent four questions – focused on solutions for Lake Winnipeg – to all Manitoba candidates representing the four federal parties running a full slate. We also contacted each party’s national headquarters.

To help you make an informed decision when you cast your ballot next week, we wanted to share what we learned.

In total, we sent out 58 inquiries. We received responses from 18 individual candidates – eight running for the Liberal Party, one running for the New Democratic Party and nine running for the Green Party – and from three parties, the Green Party, the Liberal Party and the New Democratic Party.

All responses are posted on our website.

Our candidate survey was also reported on by the Winnipeg Free Press. You can read the article here.

Remaining committed to solutions

Several recent news reports about Lake Winnipeg’s spreading zebra mussel infestation have suggested that the health of our beautiful lake is now damaged beyond repair.

As a community of lake-lovers, we remain committed to our founding members’ vision of a clean, healthy Lake Winnipeg and watershed. Ten years ago, they saw a lake in trouble – and instead of throwing up their hands in despair, they rolled up their sleeves and got to work.

We recognize that zebra mussel populations can have an effect on eutrophication and therefore, will likely be a complicating factor as we work to reduce phosphorus loading, the root cause of harmful algae blooms in our great lake. But we also recognize that hopelessness prevents us from moving forward.

Now more than ever, Lake Winnipeg needs our help. LWF will continue our efforts to translate science into solutions.

Extra! Extra!

The Fall & Winter 2015 edition of our newsletter, The Watershed Observer, is out!

In this issue, you’ll find updates on wetland protection and boreal conservation, get to know songwriter Sol Sigurdson (aka “The Lake Winnipeg Fisherman”), and learn how you can help ensure clean water is on the agenda of decision-makers. Plus, we acknowledge the many individuals and organizations who make a healthy Lake Winnipeg possible by joining our growing network of change. We hope you enjoy the read!

Thank you for your continued support,

The LWF team

You are receiving this e-update because you are currently subscribed to the Lake Winnipeg Foundation’s online mailing list.

 

This zebra-mussel-encrusted rock was found on Sept. 26, 2015 near Balsam Harbour (Photo: Greg Armstrong).

Oct. 26, 2015, Winnipeg – Zebra mussels continue to spread in Lake Winnipeg. Adult mussels and their microscopic larvae (known as veligers) have been detected throughout the south basin of the lake and in the Red River. More recently, the invasive species has also been discovered in the north basin of Lake Winnipeg and in Cedar Lake, just west of Lake Winnipeg.

Today, Manitoba’s Conservation and Water Stewardship Minister Tom Nevakshonoff announced that the province plans to double its...

On Oct. 19, the Manitoba government released the Clean Environment Commission’s report on Lake Winnipeg regulation.

The CEC and its role

The Manitoba Clean Environment Commission (CEC) is an arms-length provincial agency established to provide advice and recommendations to the minister of conservation and water stewardship, and to develop and maintain public participation in environmental matters. Its recommendations are not binding; the minister reviews them and chooses whether to adopt them.

The scope of the recent report

The CEC was asked to conduct a review and gather public input on...